My great-grandfather, Antonio Della Barba, was from Naples.  He came to this country in 1902 and settled in New Jersey.   Antonio married my great-grandmother, Mary Scaringa, and together they raised 13 children and ran a tomato farm.

 

I left Jersey 25 years ago.  However, over the years, I have come to the realization that although you can take the boy out of Jersey, you can't take the Jersey out of the boy.  Which brings me to the task at hand - PIZZA.

 

This Jersey Boy loves pizza.  Pizza joints are everywhere in Jersey.  It wasn't a question as to whether we were having pizza for dinner on Friday Night, it was only a question as to where we were going to get it.  Everybody had their favorites. 

 

For the past 22 years, however, I've been in a kind of pizza purgatory.  Let me explain.  The first 10 years of pizza purgatory I suffered quietly.  I was an attorney clocking way too many hours each week.  I didn't think of much of anything but my caseload and the avalanche of emails that were pummeling me every day.  

 

However, every chance I had when I was in Jersey, Philly or New York I would get my pizza fix.  Back then I had a lot of meetings in New York and because my wife, Trixie, a total Philly Chick, loves pizza too, I was often bringing whole pies back from NY on Amtrak. 

   

Then, about 12 years ago, a chef friend of mine got me hooked on baking bread at home and that quickly led to me baking my own pizza at home.  Now it's time to share. 

 

Della Barba Pizza is the kind of throwback pizza joint you might find in Philly, New York or Chicago.  DB's approach is "Old Scuola".  Put simply, we are incorporating artisan baking techniques and hand-crafting small batch/slow rise pizza classics like NY, Chicago, & Detroit.  The artisan influence on the tried and true pizzas we all love makes them even more crave-worthy.  Just like the pizza you had when you were a kid. 

 

 

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